Michael Johnson Jr.’s cleats have never dug into a Texas high school football field, and yet he has reached stardom in the eyes of many around the state for this tweet:

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Michael Johnson Jr. is a QB for The King’s Academy in San Jose, California

“I first got to know about Texas high school football when my dad was the Player Personnel Director for the 2014 Simper Fidelis High School All-American game,” he said.

The United State Marine Corps hosts the event. Players are selected not only for their on-field abilities but their high character grades as well.

“The head coach of Cedar Hill was the coach of the West team,” Johnson continued. “That’s when I first got to know how serious Texas high school football was.”

Longhorns Head Coach Joey McGuire led his West team, overtaking Christopher Merritt, the head coach of Christopher Columbus Catholic High School in Miami, Florida, and the East team with a 20-17 win.

The 2014 West team roster highlighted the best of Texas talent: Dallas Skyline OT Ty Barrett, Texas City WR Armanti Foreman, Katy TE Logan Lister, Lake Travis RB Shaun Nixon, Desoto CB Nick Orr, Rockdale OG Joshua Pelzel, Ennis RB Terence Williams and a few others.

After that game, Johnson said he began “watching Kyler Murray highlights after his junior season.”

At 6-foot-2 and 165-pounds, Johnson is quite the talented athlete himself.

More: Michael Johnson Jr. impresses at one of Rivals Quarterback Challenge Regional Camps

“I am a passing QB that has the ability to run when the pocket breaks down.”

Rivals.com noted that Johnson, a class of 2019 prospect, has great potential. Michael Johnson Sr. was a collegiate signal caller for Arizona State and Akron and coached at the college level and in the NFL; he is now his son’s quarterback coach. It seems the sky is the limit for the young man who will be a freshman gunslinger this upcoming season at The King’s Academy in San Jose, California.

Johnson said after watching Murray’s highlights, “I then looked into Allen football and I watched their documentary of the 2014 season and saw how dedicated and serious players everywhere in Texas were.”

He sometimes wishes he was part of a team with his same work ethic, “and I felt like if I played Texas high school football that would happen.”

But even then, Johnson does think highly of his team.

“I believe that we have a team with a lot of athletes that can do great things, which can make my job easier sometimes.”

After a camp, Rivals.com wrote that “Johnson is advanced from a mental and mechanical standpoint, and that understanding is evident when he has the ball in his hands.”

Understanding is also evident when he has a smart device in his hands. One tweet and he gained fans from the state where high school football is enthroned.